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07 September 2007 @ 09:13 pm
Human Nature Book/TV Comparison, Part Two  
Sorry for the wait on this, folks, but Sci-Fi took a break for a week so I figured I would, too. SPOILERS, although do I even need to say it?


Similarities:
-I noticed this time around that three of the four Family of Blood members seem to be homages to the original Aubertides. I already picked out that the sister is an obvious reference to Aphasia (little girl with a red balloon), but the son has green eyes and the ostensible, violence-happy leader of the Aubertides is Greeneyes, named for obvious reasons, and posed as a young man, and the father was a gentleman who barked out military orders but was otherwise not very much involved. August, the oldest of the Aubertides, posed as a war veteran. The mother taking Jenny's form may have been a reference to when Greeneyes posed as Constance, Benny's friend, to try to get closer to her.
-The aliens attack the school and the boys are forced to fight.
-The headmaster is named Rocastle, and his discussion with the son of the Family of Blood prior to the attack is almost identical to his discussion with Greeneyes in the book.
-The one posing as a little girl infiltrates the school personally first in both the book and the show.
-John Smith snaps upon seeing the boys having to fight and forces them to retreat, taking them to relative safety.
-Joan, against John Smith's advice, goes to help the wounded boys.
-Joan and the companion have a very tense conversation in the school during the fight over her being in love with John Smith.
-Timothy is not present for most of the fight due to the Doctor's essence telling him not to be.
-Timothy has a vision from the watch of someone dying with Hutchinson in WWI.
-John Smith and Joan are finally convinced that he's really the Doctor.
-John Smith doesn't want to become the Doctor again.
-John Smith's original plan was to give the Doctor's essence to the invading aliens.
-Joan makes a vague mention (from reading Smith's journal) that the Family of Blood have the same intention as the Aubertides in the book (to use the Time Lord essence to extend their lives, reproduce, and take over the universe).
-Smith becomes the Doctor again "offscreen".
-Smith infiltrates the alien invaders' base pretending to still be Smith and gives them what they want, but it turns out to be a trick.
-The Doctor makes an offer to take Joan with him, saying that he could try to love her, and she refuses.
-Joan keeps Smith's writings.
-We see Tim's vision being averted by Tim during the war (and the speech Ten reads is the first paragraph of the epilogue of the book).
-The Doctor and his companion go to see Tim in his old age at a memorial ceremony.

Differences:
-For some reason Timothy's last name is "Latimer" on the show. It was "Dean" in the book.
-Tim's vision in the book is of Richard, the leader of the local Labour Party chapter, and Hutchinson being killed in WWI, not of himself and Hutchinson.
-The attack on the school happened during the day in the book.
-Rocastle had originally called an assembly because Benny and Alexander had convinced him one of the boys stole something from Alexander's museum (trying to get him to get the student with the Pod to hand it over), which is when the bell to fight was rung and when the attack took place.
-Timothy was never present at the assembly or the fight.
-The Aubertides didn't have scarecrows or anything else aiding them in battle. Just their own advanced weapons and superior intelligence.
-The boys did all of the fighting within the school itself, most of them firing on the Aubertides from their dorm rooms.
-The Aubertides never found the TARDIS.
-Aphasia was shot to death after going into the school and killing some of the boys.
-John Smith found a secret passage in the library that lead to the pub and lead the surviving boys to safety.
-The surviving Aubertides set off a bomb that turned the school and anyone remaining inside of it to glass.
-The Aubertides separated the town from the rest of the world with a temporal field that caused various messy effects to anyone who touched it. It's mentioned only a Time Lord can pass through without ill-effects. The dome held the army at bay.
-Rocastle wasn't killed at the school battle. He blew himself up to take out Serif the Aubertide.
-The boys set a trap and took Greeneyes captive.
-While Joan was still held hostage, John Smith and Benny pretended to be Greeneyes and Aphasia, having assumed their appearances, to get her back from the Aubertides.
-In the book, John Smith was a lot calmer about the knowledge that he was originally the Doctor. He simply stated that he liked being himself and had no great desire to be the Doctor, but humored Benny into thinking he'd accepted that he was the Doctor.
-John Smith and Joan Redfern were engaged in the book. Also, it's stated Joan was 48 and John Smith wasn't much younger.
-Joan muses when the school is destroyed that she'll have no job because Rocastle only gave her her job because he was an army buddy of her husband's, and he once proposed to her thinking it was the right thing to do for his friend. Nothing of the sort is mentioned on the show.
-Although it's Tim who convinces John to become the Doctor, his reasons for not giving back his essence sooner were different: in the show, Tim says the Doctor is powerful and frightening and wonderful and he wasn't supposed to give him the watch yet. In the book, Tim was being selfish and having too much fun with the Pod and didn't want to give it back. Also, Tim convinces him by showing him what will happen to the universe (including Gallifrey) if the Doctor doesn't stop the Aubertides.
-It's implied Joan saw John become the Doctor again in the show. In the book, not only did she not see it, she didn't know he had until he came back to see her in the end.
-To trick the Aubertides, the Doctor, posing as John, gives August the Pod. The Pod actually contains John Smith's essence, and because August only gave himself personality protection against Time Lord essence, he essentially became John Smith. Hoff then shot and killed him, realizing what had happened.
-Death, a Time Lord deity from the books, comes to claim John Smith. John asks the Doctor not to tell Joan what really happened to him, since he doesn't think she could take the knowledge that she watched him die.
-Joan assumes that August had had a change of heart at the last moment, which was the reason for his uncharacteristic behavior, and believes the Doctor is still John. The Doctor tells her to go home and wait for him, and plans to leave without talking to her.
-In the show, it looks as if the Doctor came to talk to Joan of his own volition, and he practically begs her to come with him. In the book, Benny has to convince him just leaving her would be cruel, especially since she doesn't know John is gone now, and he makes a half-hearted at best offer for her to come with him. She gives him her cat instead.
-In the show, it's stated the Doctor wasn't so much hiding as being merciful by not facing the Family of Blood, waiting for them to die out on their own. In the book, as I said, the whole experiment was just for shits and giggles.
-In the show, the Doctor wraps the father in unbreakable chains and drops him in a pit, throws the mother into a black hole, traps the sister in a mirror, and makes the son into a scarecrow, all meant to show how pitiless and cruel he can be. The book was just the opposite: he allowed human authorities to have Greeneye (saying to make sure he stays on a vegetarian diet, because Aubertides can turn into anything they eat. He is eventually given a steak, turns into a cow, and it backfires when it leads to him being slaughtered, but the Doctor was long gone for this), and Hoff and August were trapped in the remnants of the collapsed temporal field that caused them both to relive over and over the only moment where they were happy (which was when Hoff was born). The one who made the Doctor human in the first place is later hunted by someone not working for the Doctor. So basically, Ten = DOOMBRINGER, Seven = Kind and Merciful to Evil Aliens, Huge Jerk to Human Women Whose Hearts He Breaks.
-In the epilogue, we see the averted attack. Although Hutchinson dies, Richard is saved my Timothy, who refused to become a soldier, but is now a field medic for the Red Cross.
-When the Doctor and Benny go into the future to see Tim at the memorial ceremony, Tim dies shortly after seeing them.
 
 
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jedi_of_urth: foreverjedi_of_urth on September 8th, 2007 02:32 am (UTC)
When the Doctor and Benny go into the future to see Tim at the memorial ceremony, Tim dies shortly after seeing them.

I wouldn't be surprised if that had been the case in FoB also, we just didn't see it. Although I still think it couldn't possibly have been 2007 when they saw Old-Tim as he would have been at least 107 at that point and he didn't look that old. No matter what Blog-Martha says on the subject I think it was the 80s at the latest.

Ten = DOOMBRINGER, Seven = Kind and Merciful to Evil Aliens, Huge Jerk to Human Women Whose Hearts He Breaks.

And considering Cornell wrote both versions of the story he knows exactly how changed that makes the Doctor's character. I guess we can say this for Ten, he's much nicer to Joan about the whole deal even if he is leaving the Family in eternal torment (which I'm not getting over any time soon). Ten strangely manages to be merciless yet kind (even if he is breaking hearts rather frequently); Seven, merciful but jerkish. He's been through a lot since the book was written, but I'm not sure either way is a great role model.

And it sounds like, in spite of everyone doing thins 'because they felt like it' in the book, the actual feeling made it into the show; yep I like it this way thank you (even if I'm not getting over evil-Doctor any time soon).
A Guy Named Goo: Rose Watchaguynamedgoo on September 8th, 2007 05:27 am (UTC)
I believe the book said that Tim was in his 90s at the Memorial service/when he died. Considering the book came out in 1995, that works.

On the one hand, I didn't like seeing that Ten could be a torturer so much. I know he has his "one warning" rule and he takes it seriously, but he's usually not into the torture routine. Then again, he also spent most of S3 being tortured, physically, mentally, and emotionally, so maybe at that point, it was the final straw and he just snapped and needed to release a lot of his pent up rage. Hopefully being further tortured by the Master for a year got rid of the Doctor's jones for cruelty.